About the Series

Briony Douglas

"The goal isn't to live forever, the goal is to create something that will."- Chuck Palahniuk

Briony Douglas is a Toronto based photographer and artist; her work internationally recognized and published. She uses photography as an outlet to create unique compositions, allowing her to stand out in her industry. In her photography we see Briony talk about conceptual themes often empowering women and their sexuality. For this initiative she uses photography as an opportunity to open up and be apart of a broader conversation in the Elimination of Violence Against Women and Girls, stating that:

"A problem now a days is that we often feel untouched by the problems of others, unless it happens to us. We need to create a global community; we need to show people they are part of a larger we. Giving people access to data most often leaves them feeling overwhelmed and disconnected, not empowered and poised for action. This is where art can make a difference. Art does not show people what to do, yet engaging with a good work of art can connect you to your senses, body, and mind.

I am grateful to be a part of this project as it is something I myself was touched by years ago. I think the more people speak out about it the less people out there will feel alone, I am glad to be a part of that conversation."

Briony uses a veil in her imagery as a metaphor for the disconnection between the subject and the audience, referring to the larger disconnection society has with those who suffer forms of violence and abuse. The veil creates this barrier between the subject and the audience, blurring our vision of her, and suffocating her voice. 

We see different elements of collage beginning to emerge in her photographs as we progress through the series, melding reality with this ambiguous and surreal atmosphere. We see it first appear in the use of illustrated leaves and then shift to a dove that has been super imposed on to her shoulder; representing hope and resilience. The series concludes with this woman sitting front and centre, regal in her posture, holding a bouquet of flowers, a token of femininity. This final image of the series dictates to us that this woman is the ruler of her femininity and has control over her sexuality.

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