About the Series

Inna Mosina

Inna Mosina is a Russian, fine art photographer, with an innate ability to combine the dreamlike and ethereal with conceptual themes and ideologies. She chooses to represent contemporary Russian women, often suspended in time and emotionless, allowing the audience to discover for themselves

the world beyond the face. She uses colour in her photographs to put emphasis in her work.

For this series, Inna chose to raise awareness around the UNiTE to End Violence Against Women and Girls campaign by representing the many women in Russia who experience and turn a blind eye to such violence: “In Russia, there is a saying: ‘Beats means love (Qui aime bien châtie bien)’ and many women believe it”. The aggressor apologizes with gifts or flowers and is forgiven.

We can see this represented in her images, flowers; a common theme throughout the series. These flowers are literal in the sense that they are the gift presented to the abused woman, both blinding her and convincing her to stay. However, they also are symbolic of female identity and power.

The orange colouring in the flowers are reflected in the makeup around her eyes, speaking to how the flowers have clouded her vision, she is unable to think or see clearly. When we look at her hands, they are also coloured orange, discussing how these flowers have tied her to this person, she feels bound, almost obligated to stay.

As we move through the series, we see different aspects of both the model and the contents within each frame slowly change. She wrestles with the ropes that bind her to this situation, ultimately shedding her confines. We see her bare back showing the impression of the ropes, discussing the long lasting impressions violence leaves behind, much like imprinted skin. While she will survive this, the impressions of this experience will remain.

The series is concluded triumphantly, with the woman standing in the centre of her binds, the wind subtly blowing her hair as she looks onward. This image providing a subtle reference to ‘The Birth of Venus’ By Sandro Botticelli, discussing physical love, intellectual love, beauty, sexuality and elevating us to a higher realm of thought. The reference to Venus empowers the female identity throughout this series and encourages us to love ourselves and one another.

Inna wishes to express her perspective as a gay woman living in Russia. Violence against women is not only experienced domestically, but can be experienced through forms of harassment, societal pressures and psychological torment. 45 countries criminalize same-sex relationships between

women and 1 in 3 women have experienced physical or sexual violence, world wide;

“I am against any form of violence against all women, regardless of sexual orientation. I urge the women of the world to not remain silent. It is important to love yourself and remember that you are not alone and you will not be left behind.” -Inna Mosina

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